Not An Islander

Not An Islander


What I need is the dandelion in the spring. The bright yellow that means rebirth instead of destruction. The promise that life can go on, no matter how bad our losses. That it can be good again. And only Peeta can give me that. 
So after, when he whispers, “You love me. Real or not real?” I tell him, “Real.”

What I need is the dandelion in the spring. The bright yellow that means rebirth instead of destruction. The promise that life can go on, no matter how bad our losses. That it can be good again. And only Peeta can give me that.

So after, when he whispers, “You love me. Real or not real?” I tell him, “Real.”

(via mellarkberries)

abbythebear:


Peeta and I grow back together.
by alonglineofbread

Oh my.

abbythebear:

Peeta and I grow back together.

by alonglineofbread

Oh my.

(via kleighd80)

(via mmabins1)

HEY MARIANNE! Did I miss something - whats the story with the anon and being upset about HP not taking up Minister for Magic? I've never heard anyone discuss Harry not getting a political job after the war (I always assumed he would take up Quidditch - but that's just me) and being sad about it. The MoM failed so hard with Harry I doubt he would ever want to work for them - even if Kingsley Shacklebolt was in charge. To that anon - if you want to talk about Harry - by all means send owl post.

Answer:

posthungergamessyndrome:

hi yani! sorry for the late response, but it’s basically related to an earlier discussion on how an NY senator criticized katniss for not running for office or being involved in the new government after the war, but with HP, no one was upset about it, nor that he got married (sure, there are grumblings with who he ended up marrying and how he chose to scar his kids for life name his kids, but not with Harry getting married, period). He was an auror, which is in the law enforcement field, i guess, but it’s not a political job, like you said.

but just to belatedly add to that discussion, public service or running for office is not the only way to contribute to the rebuilding of Panem, and we never really did know what Katniss or Peeta did in that 20 year gap between the end of MJ and the epilogue, they could have done something with the government again after some years or did something in the private sector, who knows. But even if they just chose to have a quiet life in 12 all that time, they more than deserved to have that and not be criticized for it. 

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 
This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

asapscience:

ohscience:

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 

This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

This rules! 

(via stoneridgehouse)

capitolcouture:

HARD COPY: NOA RAVIV
Mass-production can be difficult to steer clear of in our modern-day world- and truly, in many instances it is a phenomenon to be embraced and celebrated. In the case of burgeoning designer Noa Raviv (who engineers in District 3 have been clamoring to get their hands on), however, mass-production is the antithesis of her most recent collection. A marriage of 2D textiles and 3D printed objects, Raviv’s Hard Copy collaborative collection was brought to life in collusion with Stratasys—a manufacturer of cutting-edge 3D printing devices and software. Hard Copy challenges the current conceptions of 3D printing and mass production and instead focuses on the value contained in singular, unique works of art.
“When the model walks, it creates a game between 2D and 3D,” Raviv states at her graduate fashion show. She goes on to state that a visual point of interest in the collection’s compositions is the viewers’ uncertainty on whether what they are seeing has two dimensions or three. Indeed, the clever patterning of both the 3D printed pieces and the textile structures underneath make this a difficult separation to decipher.
Arguably the most intriguing aspect of Raviv’s designs is her conceptual process, choosing to work with imperfect images and distorted grid designs instead of structurally sound templates. By beginning with these flawed blueprints, Raviv adds another dimension of innate singularity to her creations.
Capitol Couture salutes Noa Raviv and Stratasys for their collaborative efforts and their continuing commitment to the united vision of One Panem. 
capitolcouture:

HARD COPY: NOA RAVIV
Mass-production can be difficult to steer clear of in our modern-day world- and truly, in many instances it is a phenomenon to be embraced and celebrated. In the case of burgeoning designer Noa Raviv (who engineers in District 3 have been clamoring to get their hands on), however, mass-production is the antithesis of her most recent collection. A marriage of 2D textiles and 3D printed objects, Raviv’s Hard Copy collaborative collection was brought to life in collusion with Stratasys—a manufacturer of cutting-edge 3D printing devices and software. Hard Copy challenges the current conceptions of 3D printing and mass production and instead focuses on the value contained in singular, unique works of art.
“When the model walks, it creates a game between 2D and 3D,” Raviv states at her graduate fashion show. She goes on to state that a visual point of interest in the collection’s compositions is the viewers’ uncertainty on whether what they are seeing has two dimensions or three. Indeed, the clever patterning of both the 3D printed pieces and the textile structures underneath make this a difficult separation to decipher.
Arguably the most intriguing aspect of Raviv’s designs is her conceptual process, choosing to work with imperfect images and distorted grid designs instead of structurally sound templates. By beginning with these flawed blueprints, Raviv adds another dimension of innate singularity to her creations.
Capitol Couture salutes Noa Raviv and Stratasys for their collaborative efforts and their continuing commitment to the united vision of One Panem. 
capitolcouture:

HARD COPY: NOA RAVIV
Mass-production can be difficult to steer clear of in our modern-day world- and truly, in many instances it is a phenomenon to be embraced and celebrated. In the case of burgeoning designer Noa Raviv (who engineers in District 3 have been clamoring to get their hands on), however, mass-production is the antithesis of her most recent collection. A marriage of 2D textiles and 3D printed objects, Raviv’s Hard Copy collaborative collection was brought to life in collusion with Stratasys—a manufacturer of cutting-edge 3D printing devices and software. Hard Copy challenges the current conceptions of 3D printing and mass production and instead focuses on the value contained in singular, unique works of art.
“When the model walks, it creates a game between 2D and 3D,” Raviv states at her graduate fashion show. She goes on to state that a visual point of interest in the collection’s compositions is the viewers’ uncertainty on whether what they are seeing has two dimensions or three. Indeed, the clever patterning of both the 3D printed pieces and the textile structures underneath make this a difficult separation to decipher.
Arguably the most intriguing aspect of Raviv’s designs is her conceptual process, choosing to work with imperfect images and distorted grid designs instead of structurally sound templates. By beginning with these flawed blueprints, Raviv adds another dimension of innate singularity to her creations.
Capitol Couture salutes Noa Raviv and Stratasys for their collaborative efforts and their continuing commitment to the united vision of One Panem. 
capitolcouture:

HARD COPY: NOA RAVIV
Mass-production can be difficult to steer clear of in our modern-day world- and truly, in many instances it is a phenomenon to be embraced and celebrated. In the case of burgeoning designer Noa Raviv (who engineers in District 3 have been clamoring to get their hands on), however, mass-production is the antithesis of her most recent collection. A marriage of 2D textiles and 3D printed objects, Raviv’s Hard Copy collaborative collection was brought to life in collusion with Stratasys—a manufacturer of cutting-edge 3D printing devices and software. Hard Copy challenges the current conceptions of 3D printing and mass production and instead focuses on the value contained in singular, unique works of art.
“When the model walks, it creates a game between 2D and 3D,” Raviv states at her graduate fashion show. She goes on to state that a visual point of interest in the collection’s compositions is the viewers’ uncertainty on whether what they are seeing has two dimensions or three. Indeed, the clever patterning of both the 3D printed pieces and the textile structures underneath make this a difficult separation to decipher.
Arguably the most intriguing aspect of Raviv’s designs is her conceptual process, choosing to work with imperfect images and distorted grid designs instead of structurally sound templates. By beginning with these flawed blueprints, Raviv adds another dimension of innate singularity to her creations.
Capitol Couture salutes Noa Raviv and Stratasys for their collaborative efforts and their continuing commitment to the united vision of One Panem. 

capitolcouture:

HARD COPY: NOA RAVIV

Mass-production can be difficult to steer clear of in our modern-day world- and truly, in many instances it is a phenomenon to be embraced and celebrated. In the case of burgeoning designer Noa Raviv (who engineers in District 3 have been clamoring to get their hands on), however, mass-production is the antithesis of her most recent collection. A marriage of 2D textiles and 3D printed objects, Raviv’s Hard Copy collaborative collection was brought to life in collusion with Stratasys—a manufacturer of cutting-edge 3D printing devices and software. Hard Copy challenges the current conceptions of 3D printing and mass production and instead focuses on the value contained in singular, unique works of art.

“When the model walks, it creates a game between 2D and 3D,” Raviv states at her graduate fashion show. She goes on to state that a visual point of interest in the collection’s compositions is the viewers’ uncertainty on whether what they are seeing has two dimensions or three. Indeed, the clever patterning of both the 3D printed pieces and the textile structures underneath make this a difficult separation to decipher.

Arguably the most intriguing aspect of Raviv’s designs is her conceptual process, choosing to work with imperfect images and distorted grid designs instead of structurally sound templates. By beginning with these flawed blueprints, Raviv adds another dimension of innate singularity to her creations.

Capitol Couture salutes Noa Raviv and Stratasys for their collaborative efforts and their continuing commitment to the united vision of One Panem. 

kqedscience:

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.
Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

Mesmerizing…

kqedscience:

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.

Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

Mesmerizing…

(via stoneridgehouse)